Loading...

FAQ

What is NuviFlex™?
How does NuviFlex™ work?
Are there any studies on any of the ingredients in NuviFlex™?
In what kinds of cases is NuviFlex™ most beneficial?
Is NuviFlex™ safe?
Is NuviFlex™ expensive?
Is NuviFlex™ safe to use combined with other suplements or pharmaceuticals?
My veterinarian doesn’t know what NuviFlex™ is. What can I do?
Is a loading dose necessary?
When can I expect to see results from my animal taking NuviFlex™?
I'm a veterinarian and I haven't heard of NuviFlex™. What do I do?
Is there a possibility my pet is allergic to something in NuviFlex™?
Worried your pet won't take it?
Is there any kind of guarantee for NuviFlex™?

What is NuviFlex™?


NuviFlex™ Hip and Joint Formula brings together six active ingredients (for the dog formula) and five active ingredients (for the cat formula) in a single non-prescription dietary supplement designed to improve and maintain joint health in your dog or cat. Our unique blend consists of Cetyl Myristoleate, Glucosamine HCL, Omega 3 Fatty Acids, Chondroitin, Hyaluronic Acid, and MSM (Methyl Sulfonyl Methane). Each ingredient plays a vital role in supporting hip and joint health in your pet. At Olympus Brands, we’ve deliberately formulated NuviFlex to be one of the most comprehensive joint supplements for your pet, supporting healthy joints, and doing the work of several competing supplements in one.

How does NuviFlex™ work?


Olympus Brands formulated NuviFlex™ to optimize the benefits of all six ingredients (5 ingredients for cats), each of which have been shown to be highly effective in supporting joint health.
Cetyl Myristoleate (CM) is a 14-carbon monounsaturated omega-5 fatty acid and the cetyl alcohol ester of myristoleic acid. While CM is being widely researched, the precise details of its functioning are unknown. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have long been known to effectively relieve inflammation. Omega-3 fatty acids and other “good oils” (cold-water fish oils, evening primrose oils, and flaxseed oil) all fall under the category of PUFAs. The primary benefit to the body from PUFAs is their regulation of the body’s production of first and third series prostaglandins, which prevent inflammation in the joints. It is widely theorized that CM performs the same function.
It is also possible that Cetyl Myristoleate modulates the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines. More recently, some have suggested that omega-5 fatty acids may form oxygenated metabolites, which have anti-inflammatory properties.
CM seems to be far more effective than PUFAs generally because the anti-inflammatory effects are much more lasting. Some have theorized that CM somehow reprograms T cells though a process in which pain response and inflammation activity is altered.
Research continues on several fronts, and differing opinions are ubiquitous. Nevertheless, the beneficial effects have been strongly correlated and established.

Glucosamine HCL is a building block amino sugar for the glycosaminoglycans matrix (GAGs). GAGs give joint cartilage extra firmness while bearing weight. Its beneficial effects have been documented and established in several human and animal. Glucosamine supplements of every form are extracted from shellfish and have been proven to ease the discomfort of arthritis in clinical studies since 1980. It comes in several supplement forms including sulfate and Glucosamine HCL. Studies have also demonstrated Glucosamine’s effectiveness in soothing discomfort associated with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, bursitis, disc degeneration, ankylosing spondylitis, tendinitis, and in reducing inflammatory response. It has also shown to be effective in repairing cartilage, tendons, and ligaments as well as healing wounds in the skin. Its effective application in pets has been demonstrated in assisting dogs with inflamed discs, siatic nerve, and joint inflammation associated with aging.

Chondroitin: This chemical is produced by the body for the purpose of creating tendons, cartilage, and new bone. Cartilage is the white, tough component of a joint that decreases friction as the joint moves. It is believed that chondroitin draws fluid into cartilage in increasing its sponginess and flexibility. The supplement in its natural form is extracted from the cartilage of cows and sharks.

MSM (Methyl Sulfonyl Methane) is an excellent source of sulfur, which is a crucial element in GAGs. MSM has been shown to be effective in supporting healthy joints.

Omega 3 Fatty Acids: This well-known form of fatty acid converts into prostaglandins in the body, soothing inflammation in the joints.

Hyaluronic Acid: this is a naturally occurring viscous substance found in the connective tissues and the synovial fluid of joints that both protects and cements the joints. It increases the viscosity of joint fluid, which lubricates and cushions the joints from shock and load-bearing. Some have suggested that cartilage cells also benefit from its supplementation.

Are there any studies on any of the ingredients in NuviFlex™?


Yes, studies are available on all of the individual ingredients in NuviFlex™ and a partial list of those references follows at the bottom of this page under each ingredient listed as topics.

In what kinds of cases is NuviFlex™ most beneficial?


NuviFlex™ is most effective for animals already suffering from joint disease. It also has preventative uses, reducing or eliminating the need for joint injections or other procedures that may have unpleasant side effects.

Is NuviFlex™ safe?


NuviFlex™ is not known to have any side effects of contraindications. Glucosamine has previously been associated withgastrointestinal upset and increased urination in some dogs. In this event, glucosamine should no longer be administered.
NuviFlex™ is not intended for use in sheep, goats, or other ruminant animals.

Is NuviFlex™ expensive?


NuviFlex is somewhat more costly on a per-unit basis than other supplements. The high concentration of active ingredients, however, does the work of several competing products combined. This high concentration also means the dose is far lower. These benefits combined mean you save money and your pet lives happier and healthier.

My veterinarian doesn’t know what NuviFlex™ is. What can I do?


If your veterinarian is not familiar with NuviFlex™, please have them call us at 1-877-582-7235. They can also email questions to info@olympusbrands.com

Is NuviFlex™ safe to use combined with other supplements or pharmaceuticals?


NuviFlex™ is not known to have any negative interactions. While we’re certain you’ll find NuviFlex™ to be effective in improving joint health in your animal, it is not a “cure-all.” Other supplements and pharmaceuticals may be necessary. Animals taking NSAID (such as Rimadyl, Prevacox, Deramaxx, and others) may be able to reduce or eliminate dosage should they favorably respond to NuviFlex™. Pets also have no need to take other MSM or Glucosamine supplements while taking NuviFlex™. Consult with your veterinarian to formulate the optimum solution for your pet’s health.

Is a loading dose necessary?


A loading dose is required when administering NuviFlex™. See directions of use below:
NuviFlex™ Hip and Joint Formula for Dogs | Directions for Use:
Initial Loading Period: Administer 1 tablet per day per 25lbs of body weight for 4 weeks or until desired results.
Maintenance: Administer 1/2 a tablet per day per 25lb body weight or as needed. Dosage for older dogs can be maintained at a higher rate.
NuviFlex™ Hip and Joint Formula for Cats | Directions for Use:
Initial Loading Period: One capsule sprinkled on food daily for cats under ten pounds (two capsules for cats over ten pounds) every day for four to six weeks.
Maintenance Period: Once desired results are achieved, capsules may be administered every other day to support your cat’s joint health. The number of capsules administered may be increased at any time according to your cat’s needs.

When can I expect to see results from my animal taking NuviFlex™?


NuviFlex™ goes to work at the cellular level right away, though it may take a short period of time for the effects to manifest themselves. A number of factors affect the start-up period. These factors include the condition of the joints, the size of the animal, the formula used, and the animal’s age. Every animal is different. The suggested dosage and loading time are based on averages in clinical studies. Closely monitor your pet’s condition, adjusting as necessary for the best results.

I'm a veterinarian and I haven't heard of NuviFlex™. What do I do?



If you are a veterinarian, please call us at 877-582-7235

Is there a possibility my pet is allergic to something in NuviFlex™?


Check the ingredient list carefully and consult with your veterinarian before administering NuviFlex™ if your pet has a known allergy. One fact to keep in mind is that the Glucosamine used in the NuviFlex™ Hip and Joint formulas is extracted from the horny chitin of shellfish and crustaceans. Contact your veterinarian immediately if your pet develops a reaction to any product.

Worried your pet won't take it?


NuviFlex™ is chewable and flavored with prime beef for dogs (May also be crushed and mixed with pet food.), and chicken and tuna for cats. Your pet will take it without hesitation. It couldn't be easier to administer.
Explore our site to learn more about NuviFlex™: how it works and what it can do to keep your furry friend healthy and strong.

Is there any kind of guarantee for NuviFlex™?



Olympus Brands™ offers a 90 day 100% money back guarantee for our supplements if you are not completely satisfied. Just return the unused portion and we’ll refund the full cost of the product. Shipping charges are non-refundable. Please include your receipt or packing slip if available.
At Olympus Brands™ we’re committed to providing every customer with the best shopping experience possible. We’re happy to help if you have questions or need assistance in any way. Please contact our customer service department at

Olympus Brands Inc.
PO Box 772483
Miami, FL 33177
Phone: 1-877-582-7235 Monday – Friday 10am to 4pm Eastern Standard Time
E-mail: info@olympusbrands.com
Fax: 305-233-2940

Research Notes:

Cetyl Myristoleate

*Diehl H, May EL. Cetyl Myristoleate isolated from Swiss albino mice; an apparent protective agent against adjuvant arthritis in rats. J Pharm Sci 1994; 83: 296-299
*Siemandi H. The effect of cis-9-cetyl Myristoleate (CMO) and adjunctive therapy on the course of arthritic episodes in patients with various autoimmune diseases characterized by the common
terminology ‘arthritis’ and ‘psoriasis’. Townsend Letter for Doctors and Patients Aug Sept 1997.
Barathur R, Bookout J. A fatty acid ester complex (CMC) improves quality of life outcomes in Osteoarthritis (OA) patients. J Rheumatology 2002; 29: 1708-1712.
*Iguchi K, Okumura N, Usui S et al. Myristoleic acid, a cytotoxic component in the extract from Serenoa repens, induces apoptosis and necrosis in human prostatic LNCaP cells. Prostate 2001;47: 59-65
*Bonnet C, Bertin P, Cook-Moreau J et al. Lipoxygenase products and expression of 5-lipoxygenase and 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein in human cultured synovial cells. Prostaglandins 1995; n50: 127-135
*Hunter KW Jr, Gault RA, Stehouwer JS et al. Synthesis of Cetyl Myristoleate and evaluation of its therapeutic efficacy in a murine model of collagen-induced arthritis. Pharmacol Res 2003; 47: 43-47
*Hesslink R Jr, Armstrong D III, Nagendran MV et al. Cetylated fatty acids improve knee function in patients with osteoarthritis. J Rheumatol 2002; 29: 1708-1712
*Kraemer W, Ratamess N, Anderson J et al: Effect of a cetylated fatty acid topical cream on functional mobility and quality of life of patients with osteoarthritis. J Rheumatol 2004: 31: 767-774

Glucosamine
*Hansen R. Oral glycosaminoglycans in the treatment of degenerative joint disease in horses. Equine Practice 1996; 18: 18.
*Clayton H, Almeida P, Prades M et al. Double-Blind Study of the Effects of an Oral Supplement Intended to Support Joint Health in Horses with Tarsal Degenerative Joint Disease. Proceedings Am Assoc Eq Practitioners 2002; 48: 314-317
*Trumble T. The use of nutraceutical for osteoarthritis in horses. Vet Cl N Am 2005; 21: 575-597
*Uitterlinden E, Jahr H, Koevoet M et al. Glucosamine decreases expression of anabolic and catabolic genes in human osteoarthritic cartilage explants. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 2006; 14: 250-257
*Persiani S, Roda E, Rovati L et al. Glucosamine oral bioavailability and plasma pharmacokinetics after increasing doses of crystalline glucosamine sulfate in man. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 2005; 13: 1041-1049
*Neil K, Caron J, Orth M. The role of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfatge in treatment for and prevention of osteoarthritis in animals. JAm Vet Med Assoc 2005; 226: 1079-1088
*Reginster J, Deroisy L, Lee R et al. Long-term effects of glucosamine sulphate on osteoarthritis progression: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Lancet 2001; 357: 251-256
*Clegg D, Reda C, Harris C et al. Glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate and the two in combination for painful knee osteoarthritis. New England J Med 2006: 354: 795-808
*Dechant J, Baxter G. Glucosamine and chondroitin sulphate as structure modifying agents in horses. Eq Vet J 2007; AE Issue: 90-96

Chondroitin
*Bjordal JM, Klovning A, Ljunggren AE, et al. Short-termefficacy of pharmacotherapeutic interventions in osteoarthritic knee pain: A meta-analysis of randomised placebo-controlled trials. Eur J Pain 2007;11(2):125-138.
*Bourgeois P, Chales G, Dehais J, et al. Efficacy and tolerability of chondroitin sulfate 1200 mg/day vs chondroitin sulfate 3 x 400 mg/day vs placebo.Osteoarthritis Cartilage 1998;6 Suppl A:25-30.
*Braun WA, Flynn MG, Armstrong WJ, et al. The effects of chondroitin sulfate supplementation on indices of muscle damage induced by eccentric arm exercise. J Sports Med Phys Fitness 2005;45(4):553-560.
*Clegg DO, Reda DJ, Harris CL, et al. Glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate, and the two in combination for painful kneeosteoarthritis. N Engl J Med 2-23-2006;354(8):795-808.
*Towheed TE, Anastassiades TP. Glucosamine and chondroitin for treating symptoms of osteoarthritis: evidence is widelytouted but incomplete. JAMA 2000;283(11):1483-1484.
*Uebelhart D, Malaise M, Marcolongo R, et al. Intermittent treatment of knee osteoarthritis with oral chondroitin sulfate:a one-year, randomized, double-blind, multicenter study versus placebo. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2004;12(4):269-276
*Leffler CT, Philippi AF, Leffler SG, et al.Glucosamine, chondroitin, and manganese ascorbate for degenerative joint disease of the knee or low back: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study. MilMed 1999;164(2):85-91.
*Mazieres B, Hucher M, Zaim M, et al. Effect of chondroitin sulphate in symptomatic knee osteoarthritis: a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Ann Rheum Dis 2007;66(5): 639-645.
*McAlindon TE, LaValley MP, Gulin JP, et al. Glucosamine and chondroitin for treatment of osteoarthritis: a systematicquality assessment and meta-analysis. JAMA 2000;283(11):1469-1475.
*Michel BA, Stucki G, Frey D, et al. Chondroitins 4 and 6 sulfate in osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized, controlled trial. Arthritis Rheum 2005 Mar;52(3):779-86.
*Richy F, Bruyere O, Ethgen O, et al. Structural and symptomatic efficacy of glucosamine and chondroitinin knee osteoarthritis: a comprehensive meta-analysis. Arch Intern Med 2003;163(13):1514-1522.
*Berbert AA, Kondo CR, Almendra CL, et al. Supplementation of fish oil and olive oil in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Nutrition 2005;21(2):131-136.
*Connor SL, Connor WE. Are fish oils beneficial in the prevention and treatment of coronaryartery disease? Am J Clin Nutr. 1997;66(suppl): 1020S-1031S.
*Curtis CL, Hughes CE, Flannery CR, Little CB, Harwood JL, Caterson B. N-3 fatty acids specifically modulate catabolicfactors involved in articular cartilage degradation. J Biol Chem. 2000;275(2):721-724.
*Danao-Camara TC, Shintani TT. The dietary treatment of inflammatory arthritis: case reports and review of the literature. Hawaii Med J . 1999;58(5):126-131.
*Danno K, Sugie N. Combination therapy with low-dose etretinate and eicosapentaenoic acid forpsoriasis vulgaris. J Dermatol. 1998;25:703-705.
*Geerling BJ, Badart-Smook A, van Deursen C, et al. Nutritional supplementation with N-3 fatty acids and antioxidants inpatients with Crohn's disease in remission: effects on antioxidant status and fatty acid profile. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2000;6(2):77-84.
*Hrboticky N, Zimmer B, Weber PC.Alpha-Linolenic acid reduces the lovastatin-induced rise in arachidonic acid and elevates cellular and lipoprotein eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid levels in Hep G2 cells. J Nutr Biochem . 1996;7:465-471.
*Kremer JM. N-3 fatty acid supplements in rheumatoid arthritis. Am J Clin Nutr . 2000; (suppl 1):349S-351S.
*Kris-EthertonP, Eckel RH, Howard BV, St. Jeor S, Bazzare TL. AHA Science Advisory: Lyon Diet Heart Study. Benefits of a Mediterranean-style, National Cholesterol Education Program/AmericanHeart Association Step I Dietary Pattern on Cardiovascular Disease. Circulation . 2001;103:1823.
*Jordan JM, et al. Serum hyaluronan levels and radiographic knee and hip osteoarthritis in African Americans and Caucasians in the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project. Arthritis and Rheumatism 2005;52(1):105-111.
*Akmal M, Singh A, Anand A, Kesani A, Aslam N, Goodship A, Bentley G. The effects of hyaluronic acid on articular chondrocytes. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2005 Aug;87(8):1143-9.
*Moskowitz RW. Hyaluronic acid supplementation. Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2000 Dec;2(6):466-71. Review.
*Williams JM, Zhang J, Kang H, Ummadi V, Homandberg GA. The effects of hyaluronic acid on fibronectin fragment mediated cartilage chondrolysis in skeletally mature rabbits. Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2003 Jan;11(1):44-9.
*Louthrenoo W, Kongtawelert P, Sivasomboon C, Sukitawut W. Correlation between serum hyaluronan and disease activity and severity in Thai patients with rheumatoid arthritis. J MedAssoc Thai. 2001 May;84(5):622-7.
*Takahashi K, Hashimoto S, Kubo T, Hirasawa Y, Lotz M, Amiel D. Hyaluronan suppressed nitric oxide production in the meniscusand synovium of rabbit osteoarthritis model. J Orthop Res. 2001 May; 19(3):500-3.

MSM
*Kim L, Axelrod L, Howard P, Buratovich N, Waters R. Efficacy of methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) in osteoarthritis pain of the knee: a pilot clinical trial. Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 2006; 14: 286-294

Omega 3 Fatty Acids
*Berbert AA, Kondo CR, Almendra CL, et al. Supplementation of fish oil and olive oil in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Nutrition 2005;21(2):131-136.
*Connor SL, Connor WE. Are fish oils beneficial in the prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease? Am J Clin Nutr. 1997;66 (suppl): 1020S-1031S.
*CurtisCL, Hughes CE, Flannery CR, Little CB, Harwood JL, Caterson B. N-3 fatty acids specifically modulate catabolic factors involved in articular cartilage degradation. J Biol Chem . 2000;275(2):721-724.
*Danao-CamaraTC, Shintani TT. The dietary treatment of inflammatory arthritis: case reports and review of the literature. Hawaii Med J . 1999;58(5):126-131.
*Danno K, Sugie N. Combination therapy with low-dose etretinate and eicosapentaenoic acid for psoriasis vulgaris. J Dermatol .1998;25:703-705.
*Geerling BJ, Badart-Smook A, van Deursen C, et al. Nutritional supplementation with N-3 fatty acids and antioxidants in patients with Crohn's disease in remission: effects on antioxidant status and fatty acid profile. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2000;6(2):77-84.
*Hrboticky N, Zimmer B, Weber PC. Alpha-Linolenic acid reduces the lovastatin-induced rise in arachidonic acid and elevates cellular and lipoprotein eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid levels in Hep G2 cells. J Nutr Biochem . 1996;7:465-471.
*Kremer JM. N-3 fatty acidsupplements in rheumatoid arthritis. Am J Clin Nutr . 2000; (suppl 1):349S-351S.
*Kris-Etherton P, Eckel RH, Howard BV, St. Jeor S, Bazzare TL. AHA Science Advisory: Lyon Diet Heart Study. Benefits of aMediterranean-style, National Cholesterol Education Program/American Heart Association Step I Dietary Pattern on Cardiovascular Disease. Circulation. 2001;103:1823.

Hyaluronic Acid
*Jordan JM, et al. Serum hyaluronan levels and radiographic knee and hip osteoarthritis in African Americans andCaucasians in the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project. Arthritis and Rheumatism 2005;52(1):105-111.
*Akmal M, Singh A, Anand A, Kesani A, Aslam N, Goodship A, Bentley G. The effects of hyaluronic acidon articular chondrocytes. J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2005 Aug;87(8):1143-9.
*Moskowitz RW. Hyaluronic acid supplementation. Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2000 Dec;2(6):466-71. Review.
*Williams JM, Zhang J, Kang H, UmmadiV, Homandberg GA. The effects of hyaluronic acid on fibronectin fragment mediated cartilage chondrolysis in skeletally mature rabbits. Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2003 Jan;11(1):44-9.
*Louthrenoo W,Kongtawelert P, Sivasomboon C, Sukitawut W. Correlation between serum hyaluronan and disease activity and severity in Thai patients with rheumatoid arthritis. J Med Assoc Thai. 2001 May;84(5):622-7.
*Takahashi K, Hashimoto S, Kubo T, Hirasawa Y, Lotz M, Amiel D. Hyaluronan suppressed nitric oxide production in the meniscus and synovium of rabbit osteoarthritis model. J Orthop Res. 2001 May;19(3):500-3.

 

 

Made in USA